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Welcome to our general Forum page.  Please feel free to post a comment on any issue or topic area. If you upload a picture, it will be available for you to insert here with your post. IF YOU WANT HELP WITH IDENTIFICATION, PLEASE PROVIDE A FULL POSTCODE OR GRID REFERENCE AND DATE of the record so that it can be added to the recording scheme. You will need to register and be logged-on to post to the forum. Find out more

Tue 31st July 2012 12:53 by Matt Prince
t.nigrita - probably
Initially I was trying to match to t.montana, but the embolus (Is this the correct term for the structure that juts furthest forward?) was too short and did not have the same 'wiggle' at the tip as illustrated in Roberts and my previous voucher (presumably this fine structure can break though). Instead the tip is stouter and there is a fold on the lower edge which shows as a small curled dark triangle in my photograph. The whole palp appears more compact than my previous t.montana voucher and from the angle given the structures match Roberts illustration of t.nigrita fairly closely.

The cheliceral structures from t.montana are quite subtle, a pointed tooth rather than a blunt one, and a slight rectangular bump on the inner edge (as I'm sure you know !).

The colour is presumably at the paler end of what you would expect for t.nigrita?

I think it is t.nigrita, but my experience of tetragnatha at this level is next to nil, and I understand your reservations about photo id (not three dimensional enough) so shall I send it to you for final confirmation?

As for the e.maculipes.. this was ST3000 so inland.. but not a huge distance from the coast, sadly a lot of the hedge in the area had been flailed extensively, this specimen was from a gateway where it was still in good shape.

Regards, Matt

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Tue 31st July 2012 11:34 by Peter Harvey
t.nigrita - probably..
Tetragnatha can be a nasty group and I wouldn't like to make any comment without seeing an actual specimen, but if the cheliceral characters match then the id is probably ok. T. nigrita is usually though distinctly dark compared to other Tetragnatha.

The Episinus maculipes is interesting - whether this spider has been spreading in recent decades or simply overlooked is problematic. It certainly now appears to be widespread along the south coast region and likely to occur more widely in the south-west.

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Mon 30th July 2012 18:45 by Matt Prince
t.nigrita - probably..
tetragnatha nigrita mp4 Copyright: Matt Prince tetragnatha nigrita mp2 Copyright: Matt Prince

More of the same spider from a Devon hedgerow - unfortunately neither of the cheliceral characters from LM&M show up in the photographs.

What do you think?

Regards, Matt

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Mon 30th July 2012 18:32 by Matt Prince
Tetragnatha nigrita
I'm reasonably sure this is t.nigrita from my first bash on a 'virgin' VC3 square.

tetragnatha nigrita Copyright: Matt Prince

Also using LM&M (thanks for the recommendation Peter) the two cheliceral characters matched (though they don't show up well in photographs) namely the sharply pointed tooth between apothysis and "sl" and the blunt projection on posterior inner cheliceral surface. Colour initially threw me as it wasn't that dark to my inexperienced eye and I thought the wife (she is very good at finding decent spiders) had just handed me a male t.montana..

Will post more pics and can provide specimen if there is doubt.

Regards, Matt

p.s. and an adult female episinus maculipes, from good old Devon hedgerow in what looked like fairly bog standard arable countryside.

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Sat 28th July 2012 09:47 by Ian Maclachlan
Thanks Peter, I'm glad the info will be of use to you.
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Fri 27th July 2012 17:05 by Peter Harvey
Yes, the first image in particular can only be Larinioides sclopetarius. Very useful record, thanks for posting the details.
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Thu 26th July 2012 01:22 by Ian Maclachlan
Larinioides sclopetarius?
I found these on Tuesday (24/07/12) on a boat by North Third Reservoir near Stirling - NS755885.  Confirmation (or otherwise) of my ID as L. sclopetarius would be greatly appreciated.

Larinioides Sclopetarius for ID - 1 Copyright: Ian Maclachlan

Larinioides Sclopetarius for ID - 2 Copyright: Ian Maclachlan

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Tue 24th July 2012 14:23 by Peter Harvey
Yes, Araneus diadematus - a very variable spider in terms of colour and markings. This is probably a subadult, still early for adults yet. Many thanks for the location and date.
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Tue 24th July 2012 01:49 by Marco McGinty
Araneus diadematus?
Another one from Largs, Ayrshire (VC75), which I believe is Araneus diadematus.  It was found in the greenhouse on 23 July at NS211595.  Confirmation or correction greatly received.

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Thu 12th July 2012 22:29 by Peter Harvey
This is Tibellus, probably T. oblongus.
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Thu 12th July 2012 19:20 by Richard Arnott
ID required
Please can someone identify this spider for me. Thank you.UNKNOWN Copyright: Richard Arnott
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Thu 12th July 2012 16:53 by Marco McGinty
Many thanks, Peter.
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Thu 12th July 2012 07:55 by Peter Harvey
Yes, I would agree with Mitopus morio.
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Thu 12th July 2012 01:24 by Marco McGinty
I have another couple of very poor quality photos of Harvestmen, both taken at Gull's Walk, Hunterston, Ayrshire (both in square NS1952).  I have tentatively identified them both as Mitopus morio, however I am happy to be told otherwise, or that they can't be identified.

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Wed 11th July 2012 23:46 by Marco McGinty
Thanks again Peter.  I'll try and hunt down a copy of the Hamlyn book and order a copy of the Collins and in the meantime I will research the species summary pages.
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Tue 10th July 2012 15:42 by Peter Harvey
There are two good guides, Dick Jones 1989. A guide to spiders of Britain and Northern Europe. London: Hamlyn, also I think republished in a slightly different form, but now out of print, and Michael Roberts 1995 Spiders of Britain & Northern Europe. London: HarperCollins, also republished. These are both well illustrated and enable some identifications to be made from photographs. However, the vast majority of species cannot be reliably determined to species level from images. You can see on this website in the species Summary pages an 'identification difficulty' number is given, where an identification level of 1 includes that an id is usually possible from a photo and a level of 2 means an id may be possible from a photo.

I agree your photo of Tetragnatha is probably Tetragnatha extensa, but one can't see the sternum, the underside of the cephalothorax, to confirm the presence of a light stripe. I agree the other is Larinioides sclopetarius. Many thanks for the record details.

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Tue 10th July 2012 01:55 by Marco McGinty
OK, thanks for that Peter.  Without having to resort to microscopic equipment, is there a list of arachnids that can be identified by sight or from photographs and if so, is there a decent illustrated publication that one can refer to?  I often find that literature in the UK for less common invertebrate groups is sadly lacking and I find constant websearching tedious and frustrating.  I would much rather read or look for the information in a book!

I have another couple of photos that, through my internet searches, I have arrived at possible identifications.  The first I believe is Tetragnatha extensa, and was photographed on 15 June 2010 on the Portencross Coast SSSI in Ayrshire (appx grid ref NS176502).  The link for this is;http://srs.britishspiders.org.uk/portal.php/p/Picture/r/view/s/Tetragnatha+for+ID/u/228/x/70d22449 link

The other (due to its habitat) I have a feeling could be Larinioides sclopetarius.  This was taken at the Marine Construction Yard, Hunterston in Ayrshire on 25 June 2012 and the grid reference for this is NS186532.  The link for this is; http://srs.britishspiders.org.uk/portal.php/p/Picture/r/view/s/L.+sclopetarius+for+ID/u/228/x/70d22449 link

Any help gratefully received.

Marco

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Mon 9th July 2012 22:11 by Peter Harvey
Unfortunately it is not possible to identify Araniella to species from photographs or juveniles (which your photo may show). They need microscopic examination of the adult genitalia, and even then can be less than easy.
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Mon 9th July 2012 21:16 by Marco McGinty
I have added another photo (link below) which I believe is one of the Araniella species, and I myself would go for cucurbitina.  Any confirmation or correction would again be much appreciated.

http://srs.britishspiders.org.uk/portal.php/p/Picture/r/view/s/araniella+for+ID/u/228/x/35c9ca1c link

If a positive ID can be made from this, the recording details are as follows:

Date: 21 May 2012 Place: Hunterston, Ayrshire Grid Ref: NS195516

Thanks again

Marco

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Sat 7th July 2012 20:31 by Peter Harvey
Dear Marco

Many thanks. I have added your record to the recording scheme.

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Sat 7th July 2012 20:29 by Marco McGinty
Dicranopalpus ramosus
Dear Peter

Many thanks for the confirmation.  I've managed to track down the exact date as 29 August 2008.  If there is anything else you need to know, just ask and I will try to help.

Thanks

Marco

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Sat 7th July 2012 09:22 by Peter Harvey
Dear Marco

Yes, this is Dicranopalpus, unmistakable with its distinctive palps. Thanks for the location details. A date, even a year, would be useful if you can track this down.

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Sat 7th July 2012 03:12 by Marco McGinty
Dicranopalpus ramosus?
I've been going through some of my older photos stored on the PC, when I came across this one.  It appeared to be easily recognisable and when doing a search I arrived at the above species.  I will freely admit that I do not know my arachnids but I would be most grateful if anyone can confirm or correct the identification.

I am in Ayrshire (VC75) so if it is indeed D. ramosus then it might be a noteable record.  It was taken in my back garden (NS211595) a few years ago when I noted it on the garden fence whilst moth trapping.  Unfortunately, I do not have the exact date to hand however I will be able to track this down eventually. With a bit of luck, the link below should take you to the image.

http://srs.britishspiders.org.uk/portal.php/p/Picture/r/view/s/DSCF1954/u/228/x/4959bbe4 link

Thanks

Marco

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Tue 3rd July 2012 08:14 by Peter Harvey
I will look to add this spider to the easily recognisable species, but may not be able to do the necessary web page and content work straight away.
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Mon 2nd July 2012 12:00 by Anthony Brandreth
Nuctenea umbratica
Nuctenea umbratica  on back trellis... Copyright: Anthony Brandreth

Regular visitor,I think this is a relatively common species that is easy to identify when adult, could it not be included in the species that people can record?

Apologies if this has been done before,be gentle with me I'm a newbie!

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