Forum

Welcome to our general Forum page.  Please feel free to post a comment on any issue or topic area. If you upload a picture, it will be available for you to insert here with your post. IF YOU WANT HELP WITH IDENTIFICATION, PLEASE PROVIDE A FULL POSTCODE OR GRID REFERENCE AND DATE of the record so that it can be added to the recording scheme. You will need to register and be logged-on to post to the forum. Find out more

Thu 31st October 2013 20:45 by Peter Harvey
Still not sure about Leiobunum. Especially with size info, I think the other one must be Metellina.
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Thu 31st October 2013 19:05 by Marco McGinty
Leiobunum close-up Copyright: Marco McGinty

Does this help?  I think I understand which part you are referring to, which would make it rotundum, but I'll leave it up to you if its clear enough in the photo.

The brown one was very small (from memory c5-7mm body length), and again the decision is yours as to whether it can be done or not.  However, I can see similarities between this and Metellina segmentata, and it has indeed given me ideas for at least one of my remaining unidentified spiders.  More on this later.

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Thu 31st October 2013 18:49 by Marco McGinty
So, it's new for the county, then?  If so, if there is any other information required, then just ask.

Thanks again for the identification of A diadematus.  I'll add it shortly.

I have a few more that I will be seeking an opinion on, so will be back soon.

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Thu 31st October 2013 18:36 by Peter Harvey
The distribution maps are as up to date as records submitted to the recording scheme. Actually, the male could be Leiobunum blackwalli, I can't really see whether the eyes are bordered by black bands (rotundum) or white (blackwalli)

The brown one looks a bit like Metellina, but could be an unusual example of Araneus diadematus. It is difficult to appreciate size and details of pattern from the photo. The grey coloured one is definitely Araneus diadematus.

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Thu 31st October 2013 18:32 by Marco McGinty
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Thu 31st October 2013 17:27 by Marco McGinty
Araneus diadematus?
Monkton spider Copyright: Marco McGinty

Another two from last year, both of which I believe to be Araneus diadematus.  Again, if they can be identified from the poor photos, confirmation or correction would be much appreciated.

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Thu 31st October 2013 16:51 by Marco McGinty
Re: Leiobunum rotundum, Opilio canestrini, Zygiella x-notata
Many thanks, Peter.

How up to date are the species distribution maps?  I note from the relevant map for Leiobunum rotundum, that it is absent from Ayrshire, where these records are from.

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Thu 31st October 2013 07:07 by Peter Harvey
Re: Leiobunum rotundum, Opilio canestrini, Zygiella x-notata
I would say that Re: Leiobunum rotundum is a female of this species, and Re: Opilio canestrini is a male Leiobunum rotundum. Re: Zygiella x-notata yes, virually certain to be x-notata. Theoretically Zygiella atrica is a possibility, but this is not a species of buildings.  Z. atrica also usually (but not completely reliably) has a reddish coloration to the pattern.
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Thu 31st October 2013 04:08 by Marco McGinty
Leiobunum rotundum

This one was found in the house on 20 September 2013.  Is it Leiobunum rotundum?

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Thu 31st October 2013 03:03 by Marco McGinty
Zygiella x-notata

Found last year on 26 August 2012, in the garden greenhouse in Largs, Ayrshire (VC75), I am wondering if this can be positively identified as Zygiella x-notata, or is it something entirely different?  Any help gratefully received.

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Thu 31st October 2013 02:10 by Marco McGinty
Opilio canestrinii

This was found last year (29 September 2012) at Hunterston in Ayrshire (VC75).  I have a feeling that it is Opilio canestrinii, but would welcome an expert opinion as to its true identification, providing that it can be done from the photo.

Thanks

Marco

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Wed 30th October 2013 16:46 by Peter Harvey
Probably one of the Tegenarias but impossible to tell from the photo and Tegenaria can't be done to species without adults under a microscope.
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Tue 29th October 2013 21:36 by Sally Fellowes
i/d request large black spider
large black tegenaria type spider Copyright: Sally Fellowes

Hi, This large black spider was on the outside of our shed a couple of weeks ago. It was totally black with no markings at all, even though it does look like a tegenaria in shape; though this one had no brown on it at all. It was large, bigger than my palm in circumference. Any ideas please?

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Tue 29th October 2013 07:51 by Peter Harvey
It's not possible to be sure of the species from these photographs. There is no lighting to show any pattern on the abdomen.

Generally with any spider which lives in houses and gardens, it doesn't really matter where you put the spiders or what you do with them, others will move back in from the surrounding area fairly soon, even if you don't see them.

The media have gone mad about 'false widows'. There are (and have long been) a number of false widow spider species in this country, three of which are associated with houses and gardens. One of these in particular, Steatoda bipunctata, has been common and widespread throughout the whole country for as long as anyone has recorded spiders and is completely harmless to humans. The 'fasle widow' the media mean is the so called 'noble false widow'.

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Tue 29th October 2013 01:03 by Jacqueline Barker
false widow spider sighting_ Plymouth Devon_28Oct2013
I would like to submit a sighting of a false widow spider in Plymouth, Devon SX 44515 57668.  It was on the landing ceiling in my parents' house.  See False-Widow-Plymouth-28102013 Copyright: Jacqueline Barker and False-Widow-Plymouth-28102013b Copyright: Jacqueline Barker. It had a 'sheet' web and it's silk was very strong as it almost jumped back out of glass on its silk which was stronger than any other web I've encountered. Please can someone confirm ID and record sighting? Also, was it ok to take it outside and leave it near the back gate? I really can't destroy spiders, despite having an irrational fear of them....though that was before I'd checked its ID and realised it really was a false widow, having joked with my son as we were catching it that it could be one...as its been in the news this week.
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Sun 27th October 2013 18:47 by Peter Harvey
Araneus diadematus, the garden spider. It is a very variable orb web spider in terms of colour and pattern.  Can you provide a postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference please, so that your record can be added to the recording scheme.
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Sun 27th October 2013 15:50 by Peter Matthews
Hi there. Can anyone identify this spider please. Picture doesn't do it justice as it appeared very red, found outside under eaves. Thanks PeteUnidentified Red Spider 2 Copyright: Peter Matthews Unidentified Red Spider Copyright: Peter Matthews
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Sat 26th October 2013 15:48 by Peter Harvey
Re False widow Hertfordshire
This is Zygiella x-notata, a common orb web spider of houses, walls, fences and gardens. It is completely harmless to humans.
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Sat 26th October 2013 14:08 by H Lyons
False widow Hertfordshire
Just wondering if this is a false widow spider found on my bedroom window outside (left of picture) Many thanks
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Fri 25th October 2013 07:08 by Peter Harvey
Re: Identification-5
Yes, a Pardosa wolf spider, again probably, but not definitely, Pardosa amentata, typically a spider of slightly damper conditions (and although relevant here, the usual Pardosa of gardens).
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Fri 25th October 2013 07:04 by Peter Harvey
Re: Identification and Identification-6
These are both Metellina species, either segmentata or mengei. You can't tell which without adults under a microscope. Usually, but by no means always, M. mengei is adult in early summer and M. segmenatata in late summer/autumn. There are both quite variable in appearance.
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Thu 24th October 2013 23:03 by Les Gradwell
Identification-6
These two from today (24.10.2013) and the many spiders seen were all developing spiderlings and extremely challenging to shoot. This pair (I have morphed the images) were only 80mm apart on the same vertical web stretched between twig anchors. I thought the dark patches were a lense aberration or shadow but they are too regular on each. Images seem a bit soft at the extremes but I had to work with a high ISO and being young they are transparent.

Identification-6 Copyright: Les Gradwell

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Thu 24th October 2013 22:55 by Les Gradwell
Identification-5
This one I suspect is another kind of Wolf Spider which was walking on water. Not the best shot but the shooting location precarious. One slip and waist high in peat bog (water ph5).

Identification-5 Copyright: Les Gradwell

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Thu 24th October 2013 22:52 by Les Gradwell
Identification
One that appears slightly different to others with more rounded body:

Identification-4 Copyright: Les Gradwell

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Thu 24th October 2013 22:46 by Evan Jones
Re Identification.
Yep of course Peter. You can never ID from a photo to give absolute certainty. I am just starting with my microscope again and I am finding that it is often hard enough with that!

A photo can give a quick most likely though but can not in most cases be used by you on the recording scheme.

As for getting things wrong. I jump too quickly to conclusions a lot only to find I am wrong upon close examination. However there is often a certain something about a species which if you know it very well help with fast ID even if it will have to be confirmed using a mic.

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Thu 24th October 2013 18:41 by Peter Harvey
Is it inside? From the picture looks like an outside wall. There is also no scale, so the size of the spider can't be properly judged.

I maintain that to identify this from the picture provided is very unwise, and is indicative of a modern fashion to believe that everything can be identified from a photograph, something I believe will result in the degradation of the scientific value of biological records. There are plenty of times in my arachnological lifetime when I have provisionally identified a spider in the field using a lens and been convinced I have found a particular species, then subsequently after examination under a microscope later to find I was wrong. The same thing applies to many photographic ids, except for a rather few easily recognisable ones.

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Thu 24th October 2013 16:51 by Evan Jones
RE Thu 10th October 2013 15:56 by Charles Pizzey Spider identifi
Of course it is most likely tepidariorum inside. I had been looking at a lunatum in an unusual but similar location and forgot temporarily about the American House Spider!American House Spider Copyright: Evan Jones
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Thu 24th October 2013 16:28 by Peter Harvey
Basically it is not possible to say from the photograph. It is certainly a theridiid, could be Achaearanea, could be Achaearanea tepidariorum, but without an actual spider one can't get any further. There are too many variables and Achaearanea can be pretty tricky even under a microscope. Incidentally, Achaearanea tepidariorum remains in Achaearanea until a new British checklist is published which changes that, and the new one in preparation keeps the species in Achaearanea.
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Thu 24th October 2013 15:50 by Michael George
Thu 10th October 2013 15:56 by Charles Pizzey Spider identificat
This looks exactly like what I have had identified as parasteatoda tepidariorum. I found the spider in Bridgwater, and have a photograph. It also had the same egg sacs, which were a leathery brown colour.
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Thu 24th October 2013 12:17 by Peter Harvey
Re: Identification please
The small black one is possibly an Erigone money spider, impossible to do without microscopical examination. The unknown2 looks like a Xysticus crab spider, at this time of year a juvenile, again can't be identified to species level without adult under a microscope.
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Thu 24th October 2013 12:02 by Kevin Cox
Identification please
Good morning, Thank you very much for my ID yesterday. Today I have found these two, could you possibly help me identify these too please? I used to be very scared of spiders, but thanks to this website, getting to know the spiders I'm more intrigued than scared, and would definitely think twice about killing them now!

Unknown1 - this is a very small spider! - smallblackspider2 Copyright: Kevin Coxblacksmallspider1 Copyright: Kevin Cox

Unknown2 - unid Copyright: Kevin Cox

These were both found today at HP21 8XS, living inside a wheelie bin lid!

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Thu 24th October 2013 11:38 by T McLevy
Re: Spider or Not
Thanks again.
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Thu 24th October 2013 11:30 by Peter Harvey
Re: Spider or Not
A mite, not a spider, but I can't help any more.
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Thu 24th October 2013 11:29 by Peter Harvey
Re: Identification-3
This is a Pardosa wolf spider. These with very few exceptions can't be identified to species level without adults under a microscope. It is most likely Pardosa amentata, but there is no certainty over this.
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Thu 24th October 2013 10:53 by T McLevy
Spider or Not
Perth Spider Copyright: T McLevy This very distinctive little chap was found in premises in Perth in very large numbers coming from ceiling tiles.  There appeared to be a large number of small egg cases too.  Sorry there is no ruler in this picture but it was taken with the same microscope as my previous picture.
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Thu 24th October 2013 10:43 by Les Gradwell
Identification-3
All I can do now is restrict my input to images which stand a reasonable prospect of identification, if the particular arachnid is such that it lends itself to identifcation from an image. It would obviously not be realistic to trawl the whole index looking for a likeness as I know well from insect species I am familiar with. That said, here is # 3 then I am off out in the sun …

Identification3 Copyright: Les Gradwell

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Thu 24th October 2013 10:34 by T McLevy
Re: Unidentified spider
Thanks very much Peter, much appreciated.
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Thu 24th October 2013 10:21 by Peter Harvey
Re: Unidentified Spider
This is the garden spider Araneus diadematus. It is a very variable spider in terms of colour and degree of pattern. It is adult at late summer and autumn, when its large size and web maskes it much more easily seen. It is quite harmless to humans. We are also being inundated by reports of just about any spider found around home and garden, most nothing to do with false widows at all, due to ill-informed scaremongering by the media. These are however resulting in valuable records for the recording scheme.
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Thu 24th October 2013 09:54 by T McLevy
Unidentified Spider
Dundee Spider Copyright: T McLevy I work for a Pest Control company and we are being inundated with calls about spiders thought to be false widows thanks to the press and other scaremongering. I know this is not a false widow spider but wondered if it could be identified please?
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Wed 23rd October 2013 22:17 by Peter Harvey
The species summary pages on the website have an identification difficulty rating for each species. A rating of '1' or '2' indicates those which specialists have agreed are or may be reliably identifiable from photographs.
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Wed 23rd October 2013 21:39 by Les Gradwell
Thank you, that is clear and what we need to know.

I will continue to photograph for pleasure and to provide interesting images for others. What I now need to know is the most useful way I can contribute to the records, if indeed at all. I do not want to waste server space or time processing images that cannot alone serve any useful purpose.

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Wed 23rd October 2013 18:59 by Peter Harvey
Metellina not determined to species are not worth recording, and there is no recording taxon unit for the two species other than Metellina segmentata/mengei sens. lat. for use with very old records where the identification cannot be checked from reference voucher specimens.

Photographic views of spiders for identification purposes will vary according to the species, but usually an overall view of the abdomen and any pattern is an essential starting point. However the most important point is that the vast majority of the 670-odd British species of spider cannot be reliably identified from photographs or in the field. Examination of male palps and female epigynes of adults under a microscope is needed. Anything else, except for a small proportion of spiders, results in misidentifications and loss of scientific integrity to the resultant data.

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Wed 23rd October 2013 18:45 by Les Gradwell
Acknowledgement
Your expertise is much appreciated. I can amend my records with your good information. What I need to know is how to cite the not absolutely certain species. For example do we cite the Metellina arachnid as Metellina mengei agg. (agg. as we do with insects) or some other notation ?

The nursery spider was in a heavily wooded area, typically undisturbed and the whole area was festooned from A-Z with webs of all kinds. Total saturation. Not a nice place for insects to live in. Delightful to see though.

I will be back with more spiders as soon as I can and would welcome critique if the views shown are not helpful for identification purposes. Unless someone tells me I do not know. I am more familiar with Odonata species. Some of my shots are for aesthetic purposes.

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Wed 23rd October 2013 17:42 by Peter Harvey
Re: Identification-2
This is Pisaura mirabilis, the nursery web spider. It is very variable in colour and degree of pattern.
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Wed 23rd October 2013 17:41 by Peter Harvey
Re: Identification
This is a Metellina species, either segmentata or mengei. Youc an't tell which without adults under a microscope. Usually, but by no means always, M. mengei is adult in early summer and M. segmenatata in late summer/autumn.
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Wed 23rd October 2013 17:32 by Les Gradwell
Identification-2
My second posting for identification.

Identification-2 Copyright: Les Gradwell

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Wed 23rd October 2013 16:56 by Peter Harvey
Re: Unidentified spider
This is Zygiella x-notata, a common orb web spider of houses, walls, fences and gardens. It is completely harmless to humans. Thanks for postcode.
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Wed 23rd October 2013 16:54 by Les Gradwell
Identification
This is my first posting. I photograph a wide range of wildlife (mainly creatures small and smaller) so I am not experienced at all species. Any help with ID would be appreciated so I can file a useful record.

Identification Copyright: Les Gradwell

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Wed 23rd October 2013 16:32 by Kevin Cox
Unidentified spider
Hi there, Can you please help me to identify this spider, found this afternoon hiding under the rim of my wheelie bin please? Found in HP21. Many thanks, Kevin.

spiderhp21 Copyright: Kevin Cox

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Wed 23rd October 2013 07:02 by Peter Harvey
Re: My 5 yr old took this at the bus stop
Zygiella x-notata, a common orb web spider of houses, walls, fences and gardens. Please provide a full postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference so that your record can be added to the recording scheme contact us
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Wed 23rd October 2013 05:25 by Dylan Reid
My 5 yr old took this at the bus stop
My local bus stop Copyright: Dylan Reid can someone tell us what it is please
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Tue 22nd October 2013 19:58 by Peter Harvey
Re: can someone ID these two please?
Looks like juvenile Steatoda nobilis. Can you provide a full postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference so that your record can be added to the recording scheme please contact us.
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Tue 22nd October 2013 16:34 by Scott Wood
can someone ID these two please?
pic4 Copyright: Scott Wood pic3 Copyright: Scott Wood

these two spotted in ramsgate, has my friend found anything extravagant???

regards

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Mon 21st October 2013 14:39 by Peter Harvey
Re: Unknown spider Braemar 1
Looks like an adult male Lepthyphantes species, probably tenuis, but impossible to determine to species without careful microscopical examination of the palps.
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Mon 21st October 2013 11:56 by J G Snowball
Unknown spider Braemar 1
Unknown spider Braemar 1 Copyright: J G Snowball This unknown sp. male spider was observed in the early stages of constructing a web in a mature ivy growing up a tree in my garden between the buds of the ivy flower and foliage. A series of photographs were taken on 17 October 2103 at SN3 1HY.
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Mon 21st October 2013 11:46 by Chris Kay
thanks
Thanks Peter
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Mon 21st October 2013 11:27 by Peter Harvey
re: is this a false widow ?
No, it is an Amaurobius, almost certainly Amaurobius similis, a common spider of houses and gardens, living in walls, eaves, fences etc.
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Mon 21st October 2013 11:25 by Chris Kay
is this a false widow ?
spider found in my home Copyright: found it in my home in greater manchester
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Sat 19th October 2013 23:03 by Peter Harvey
Re: Garden shed can someone identify please
Zygiella x-notata, a common orb web spider of houses, walls, fences and gardens. Please provide a full postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference so that your record can be added to the recording scheme contact us
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Sat 19th October 2013 21:10 by Dylan Reid
Garden shed can someone identify please
Can someone identify this one please Copyright: Dylan Reid
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Sat 19th October 2013 16:40 by Evan Jones
The Benefits of False-Widow hysteria.
Hey, at least it has got people noticing spiders. Several of the anxious requests for identification here are from people concerned that they have seen a spider. (!) Two of the species noticed are Zygiella x-notata and Areaneus diadematus. You would have thought that they were hard to miss. Zygiella peeps out of the corner of every window in the country and A. diadematus swarms everywhere, including gardens, in the autumn and is a big spider. Now they are being noticed apparently for the first time by people who were born longer than a year ago. All I can say is "WELCOME TO PLANET EARTH!" What it must be to have lived here for years and only now have the blinkers taken off. Yes, it must be scary as well. That clearly explains some of the panic.

Having said all that I am wondering what people actually see and think about if it is not spiders. That is surely a challenge for all of us in the BAS to come to terms with!

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Sat 19th October 2013 16:29 by Evan Jones
RE. Sat 19th October 2013 09:09 by Scott Wood
No. They are not False Widows
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Sat 19th October 2013 15:10 by Evan Jones
RE. Sat 19th October 2013 13:13 by Dave Rennick
No it is not a False Widow
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Sat 19th October 2013 15:09 by Evan Jones
RE. Sat 19th October 2013 14:26 by Christopher Lewis
No. It is not a False Widow
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Sat 19th October 2013 14:23 by Christopher Lewis
Is this a False Widow Spider?
Please could someone identify this spider?  my wife is terrified in case they are the False Widow spiders recently on the news!

There are about a dozen of them in my corridor and I would say the diameter is about 13-18mm.

http://img689.imageshack.us/img689/3992/hzk8.jpg link

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Sat 19th October 2013 13:13 by Dave Rennick
Identification Please
Hi All,

This little guy almost landed on my wife's head :) can anyone help us identify.? She's thinks its a false widow, I'm not so sure.

Unknown Spider 1001 Copyright: Dave Rennick

Location NP4

Cheers Dave

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Sat 19th October 2013 09:09 by Scott Wood
are these false widows?
pic1 Copyright: Scott Wood pic2 Copyright: Scott Wood first off let me apoligise for asking as im sure you get lots of similar requests, secondly these were not taken by myself but by a friend about 10 miles apart in thanet,kent, i do not know much about spiders but they dont show all of the charectristics of them so im not sure but nevertheless there is so much hype id like to solve once and for all!!! many thanks in advance!
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Fri 18th October 2013 08:24 by Rebecca Chappell
Thank You
Thank you ever so much Peter Harvey.

You have elevated my fathers fears - he was thinking it was a false widow (due to recent bad press).

I have uploaded the picture and postcode to the map. Every little helps.

I may try and take a pic of our house spider we've called Boris. More than likely isn't male but he looks amazing, seems to like Great British Bake Off :)

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Fri 18th October 2013 07:02 by Peter Harvey
Re: Can anyone identify this?
A garden spider Araneus diadematus. This is a very variable spider in terms of colour and degree of pattern. It is adult at late summer and autumn, when its large size and web maskes it much more easily seen. It is quite harmless to humans. Can you provide a full postcode or map grid reference please, so that your record can be added to the recording scheme.
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Thu 17th October 2013 21:11 by Rebecca Chappell
Can anyone identify this?
I am sorry for the poor quality- my father took the photo. He found this on top of his wheely bin tonight. As he's not a fan of spiders he wouldn't get too close but was curious to know what it is. It's the first time he's seen it - we live in the M18 postcode.

Any suggestions would be very welcome thank youHome spider Copyright: Rebecca Chappell

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Thu 17th October 2013 20:41 by Adam Mantell
Re: This isn't a Steatoda for a change
Thanks Peter, I will pop it in the post to you - thanks very much for agreeing to look at it for me.

Adam

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Thu 17th October 2013 19:12 by Peter Harvey
Re: This isn't a Steatoda for a change
I wouldn't like to say what this might be. It is usually not possible to id the majority of the 670 odd British species spiders to species from photographs, because there are too many fine details which need to be seen from different angles etc to get to a species. You are welcome to post to me at 32 Lodge lane, Grays, Essex RM16 2YP.
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Thu 17th October 2013 15:15 by Adam Mantell
This isn't a Steatoda for a change
But I'm not sure what it is!  Can anyone offer any help with this please? Not a Steatoda Copyright: Adam Mantell Not a Steatoda 2 Copyright: Adam Mantell

The body is about 8mm long, with a distinctly rugose entirely dark abdomen.  It has 3 clawed tarsi, and looking closely at tarsi IV seems as best as I can tell to have serrated bristles on the ventral surface.  I appreciate the photos are pretty rubbish, but it does have a very distinctive epigyne which you may just abut be able to make out from one of the photos.  I have searched high and low in the Collins Field Guide to no avail!

I would be happy to post the specimen to someone if that would help get to an id.

Thanks,

Adam

And finally a quick plug for my blog! http://eastglamwildlife.blogspot.co.uk/

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Tue 15th October 2013 22:27 by Peter Harvey
Can you provide a full postcode or map grid reference please, so that your record can be added to the recording scheme.

I can only point you to Evan's post about this spider being one of our commonest southern spiders in the coastal counties of Southern England, where there have been lots of them in many people's house and garden for years.

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Tue 15th October 2013 19:09 by Terry Hutchenson
Multiple False Widows - Orsett
Hi, we live in RM16 (Orsett area) and first noticed a false widow around a year ago. It got our attention because of the strange web and on closer inspection and the internet it proved to be a false widow. Anyway around 2-3 months ago we noticed another web the other side of the conservatory. The new spider was quite a bit larger than the original one and in particular had a huge body, as if pregnant. Anyway we got rid of both over the fence in the garden but since then we are seeing them consistently in and around the house, none as big as the first two!

The media has made us slightly worried because we have 3 kids, of which the youngest plays in teh conservatory often. After reading this site though I feel a little more at ease.

As we have multiple should we be worried?

I will upload the pic of the very first one we had.

Orsett - First of many Copyright: Terry Hutchenson

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Tue 15th October 2013 09:28 by Peter Harvey
Thanks for postcode. I doubt you brought the spider with you, but it is impossible to know what the origin is until more confirmed records build a better picture of the spread of the spider. I would be much more comfortable with a clearer photograph of your spider, but I don't think it can be anything else. However many, many of the current media reports of 'false widows' are based on entirely different spiders and certainly cannot be relied on.
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Mon 14th October 2013 22:18 by Derek Keeling
Postcode confirmation
Hi,

Postcode is SA33 5QZ. I notice from maps that no other sitings registered in West Wales, although I work in East Anglia region and visit rural locations fairly often - could I have picked it up there and bought it back with me?

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Mon 14th October 2013 16:49 by Peter Harvey
Re: Possible False Widow?
Yes, looks like Steatoda nobilis. Can you please provide a postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference so that your record can be added to the recording scheme.
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Mon 14th October 2013 13:51 by Derek Keeling
Possible False Widow?
Hi any ideas on identification? Markings aren't that clear I'm afraid as I was holding the slipper he was running around on!

Possible False Widow I wonder Copyright: Derek Keeling

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Sat 12th October 2013 18:47 by Peter Harvey
Yes, your new photo is Steatoda grossa, probably a juvenile female. The adult females often have no pattern at all, whereas the males have a pattern like the juveniles but more distinct.
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Sat 12th October 2013 17:57 by Sarah David
Dear Peter

Thank you for your reply.

I am interested to learn it's a different variety or FW. What a minefield of nature my shed it!!

Can you also confirm this one is a S. Grossa - this is the one I found 5 years ago.

Steatoda grossa found in my shed Copyright: Sarah David

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Sat 12th October 2013 17:33 by Peter Harvey
Re: Can someone ID these for me please
These are Steatoda bipunctata. I would appreciate a postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference so that your record can be added to the recording scheme contact us.

There are a number of Steatoda species found in Britain, all so-called 'false widow' spiders. Three are possible in or near buildings, Steatoda bipunctata (very widespread), S. grossa (widespread and sometimes very frequent in the southwest, but becomes much scarcer further north and east, but in the last few years seems to be increasing) and S. nobilis, the one which gets the press for biting humans (originally confined to the south coast, now increasingly turning up elsewhere in southern England). Steatoda nobilis has on occasions been responsible for bites, and Steatoda grossa is also known to be able to pierce human skin, even though many of the cases publicized for this are almost certainly due to another cause, and there are other spiders capable of piercing human skin. Steatoda nobilis is widespread and numerous along much of the south coast, has been established in the Southend area of Essex since at least 1990, and in more recent years had spread widely and come much more numerous in England as far north as Norfolk and also south Wales.

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Sat 12th October 2013 17:29 by Sarah David
Can someone ID these for me please
One of two spiders found today Copyright: Sarah David 2 spiders found today with a large egg sac nearby Copyright: Sarah David

I discovered the two spiders in the bottom photo under my lawnmower in my shed today. The top photo is a close up of one of them.

I found a S. Grossa in my shed 5 years ago. These two have slightly different markings but are they S. Grossa as well?

Edit: The egg sac in the top picture is starting to hatch. The first spider has come emerged and it's very pale in colour but the same shape as these spiders.

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Fri 11th October 2013 16:55 by Evan Jones
Re False Widow Spiders.

The best way to get bitten by one is to squeeze it between two body parts of your choosing. I have Steatoda grossa in the cavities of my house walls and under floor boards and also increasingly I have Steatoda nobilis in just about every cool nook and cranny inside the house and around the garden. These spiders are active all the time but really perk up at night when they come out of their retreats and you can see them in their webs. I have had a big female nobilis in a large web above the door in my porch for two years now. Big and shiny!

I suppose there is some danger of a wandering spiders (usually males) getting into bedding or clothing and being pressed against the skin. The Mouse spider Scotophaeus is good at that as well! Then a bite can happen. If you do not like them James Dyson has put years of research into inventing a spider catching device that is the best way of removing them although it is expensive! What I mean is just suck them up with the hoover. The long tube removes most of the risk of them going for the jugular!.

However with the increasing popularity of the wood-burning stove there are bound to be nips from Steatodas and other big spiders when on a dark rainy night the wood runs out and the shivering householder clutches armfuls of logs from the wood shed to their bare arms and pyjama chest. There is something nasty in the woodshed after all.

The recent spread of this spider has been a major change to our spider fauna. a few weeks ago I got excited when I found a Theridiid web in the middle of an almost bare patch of saltmarsh mud. Guess who's it was. Steatoda nobilis. They are everywhere!  This spider is probably displacing other species. It is a voracious hunter of other spiders and also takes up the holes in wall etc. that were formerly home to several other types of spider not just Theridiids. It could well prove to be a bit of an invasive species biodiversity disaster. Another one!

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Fri 11th October 2013 16:40 by Evan Jones
Re: Thu 10th October 2013 15:56 by Charles Pizzey
This looks like a dark specimen of Achaearanea lunata. The little round packets are the egg sacs. They turn up in odd places like this but are most at home on low trees and bushes.
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Fri 11th October 2013 13:11 by Peter Harvey
Re: the spider at my house
Your spider is one of the orb web Metellina species, most likely M. segmentata at this time of year. They are completely harmless to humans.
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Fri 11th October 2013 13:05 by Rebecca Evans
the spider at my house
This a pic of one of the ones we found at our house (WR15 8NF), not very good photo but think you can just see the markings possible false widow again Copyright: Rebecca Evans Could you tell me if this is also a Steatoda Nobilis? Thanks
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Fri 11th October 2013 12:42 by Rebecca Evans
The false widow spider
Thanks for confirming that, we thought that's what it was. The postcode for this one in the photo was PO35 5PL, and we have seen very similar at our house at WR15 8NF. I understand that a lot of the media hype is daft and that their bite can be similar to a bee sting, but I have a 13 month old daughter and wondered if the bite would be any more dangerous for her than it is to us as she is much smaller? Thank you
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Fri 11th October 2013 07:03 by Peter Harvey
Re: please can you identify this spider for me
This seems to be an adult male Steatoda nobilis.  I would appreciate a postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference so that your record can be added to the recording scheme contact us.

There are a number of Steatoda species found in Britain, all so-called 'false widow' spiders. Three are possible in or near buildings, Steatoda bipunctata (very widespread), S. grossa (widespread and sometimes very frequent in the southwest, but becomes much scarcer further north and east, but in the last few years seems to be increasing) and S. nobilis, the one which gets the press for biting humans (originally confined to the south coast, now increasingly turning up elsewhere in southern England). Steatoda nobilis has on occasions been responsible for bites, and Steatoda grossa is also known to be able to pierce human skin, even though many of the cases publicized for this are almost certainly due to another cause, and there are other spiders capable of piercing human skin. Steatoda nobilis is widespread and numerous along much of the south coast, has been established in the Southend area of Essex since at least 1990, and in more recent years had spread widely and come much more numerous in England as far north as Norfolk and also south Wales.

The current media hype about 'false widows' (by which Steatoda nobilis is presumably meant) is beyond reason and irresponsible. See Evan's comments on this forum on 8th October. Also lots of misidentifications are being made because of all the hype. You can see the current distribution and information on the spider at summary

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Fri 11th October 2013 06:59 by Peter Harvey
Re: Spider identification please
Dear Charles

I can't help with your photo, not close enough or high enough resolution to make any worthwhile suggestions.

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Thu 10th October 2013 23:51 by Rebecca Evans
please can you identify this spider for me
possible false widow Copyright: Rebecca Evans We found this spider (and another very similar one) in our chalet on the isle of wight last week and would like confirmation of what type it is please :) We have since gone home and have found several very similar ones at home, in tenbury wells, worcestershire. Thanks for any help, becky
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Thu 10th October 2013 15:56 by Charles Pizzey
Spider identification please
Unidentified spider Copyright: Charles Pizzey

Can anyone help with identifying this spider?

Many thanks.

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Tue 8th October 2013 21:38 by Evan Jones
Do not worry
Hi Ange.

If Peter says that it is not a False Widow it is not without any shadow of a doubt. (and I agree with him totally as well having looked at the picture) I have noticed that most internet posts about spiders away from this site are not well informed. Actually False Widows are extremely common. Everybody (and I mean everybody!) in the coastal counties of Southern England has had lots of them in their house and garden for years. They are one of our commonest southern spiders. The fact that harm caused by them is very rare should tell you something about how dangerous they really are. Cars are really much more dangerous! So is Electricity. So is walking along the pavement (beware of those small irregularities!) Hot water is also really dangerous. Tea etc. Eating food can also result in choking so be careful of that. One of the worst dangers is people. Touching them or even breathing air near to them is risky as they often carry a lot of potential person specific pathogenic viruses and bacteria.

Spiders? Not really a danger in comparison with the aforementioned. I wonder why it is that we lock on to certain things like spiders to react fearfully to. However fear of spiders is no reason not to join the BAS! I know for a fact that at least one member who is the author of a recent substantial book on spiders no less, is really quite frightened of the big ones in the bath and also let out a scared yelp on a field trip recently when he walked through a large autumn orb web that covered his face. ...... and actually I am a bit scared of certain big fast ones! I would not tickle the web of a adult Segestria florentina with my finger for example. .....A good idea for an initiation ceremony for new BAS members perhaps?

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Sun 6th October 2013 14:01 by Angela Goodram
Re: can someone confirm FW
Hello

And thank you so much for confirming this As I have a very compromised immune system I was indeed worried I had seen the facebook page and asked there so was frightened when they said it was a FW it was a link from their page that sent me here, I am so grateful for your full explanation Spiders do not bother me I normally remove them from the house to the garden as I do not like killing them, so off to move these to the garden

relieved

Ange

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Sat 5th October 2013 22:47 by Peter Harvey
Re: can someone confirm FW
No,this is NOT a false widow, and enlarging the picture confirms my previous identification of Zygiella x-notata. The carapace and legs both add confirmation to this, and the pattern is not that of Steatoda nobilis (presumably the false widow being discussed on the Facebook page). The messy silk visible in the photograph will almost certainly be from Amaurobius spiders, which are often numerous on walls and eaves, and are simply confusing the issue by sharing the same general locations. It just goes to show that pages on the internet and the Facebook page are often not reliable places to get information.

This is the opinion of the National Organiser of the Spider recording Scheme, and whilst everyone can make mistakes, in this instance I would lay a lot of money on this opinion. If you can obtain a decent closer image of this spider, in focus, then this identification can be doubly and trebly confirmed.

Discussing false widow spiders, which are becoming the bane of arachnologists' lives because of the rubbish spread by the irresponsible Press, there are a number of Steatoda species found in Britain, all so-called 'false widow' spiders. Three are possible in or near buildings, Steatoda bipunctata (very widespread), S. grossa (widespread and sometimes very frequent in the southwest, but becomes much scarcer further north and east, but in the last few years seems to be increasing) and S. nobilis, the one which gets the press for biting humans (originally confined to the south coast, now increasingly turning up elsewhere in southern England). Steatoda nobilis has on occasions been responsible for bites, and Steatoda grossa is also known to be able to pierce human skin, even though many of the cases publicised for this are almost certainly due to another cause, and there are other spiders capable of piercing human skin.

Steatoda nobilis is widespread and numerous along much of the south coast, has been established in the Southend area of Essex since at least 1990, and in more recent years had spread widely and come much more numerous in England as far north as Norfolk and also south Wales (see summary). Although the media make a big fuss about supposed bites from the spider, most are almost certainly unrelated to any spider. Most 'spider bites' have other causes and the media do not present an accurate or sensible story. Generally speaking people are vastly more likely to be stung by honey bees or social wasps, and spider bites are very rare. Steatoda spiders catch their prey using an untidy 'scaffold' web in corners, under window ledges etc and are generally unlikely to leave the webs to wander around, except when the males become adult and are looking for females. One should avoid handling the spiders, but trying to exterminate the spider is unlikely to succeed for any length of time, since others will move in from the general area.

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Sat 5th October 2013 19:59 by Angela Goodram
can someone confirm FW
Help please Copyright: Angela Goodram

I have had this looked at on the false widow facebook page and they are saying it is a false widow based on pattern and messy web behind please help I know i have already posted a previous picture but this is another one I have a lot of spiders

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Sat 5th October 2013 19:53 by Chris Lea
Re: False Black Widow Spider in Taunton
It seemed logical that my spider wasn't entirely alone and so I've had a good look round our row of four sheds. Two of them are seemingly mainly occupied by T. gigantea at a guess - the usual huge hairy house spiders. Another shed, whose roof leaks like a sieve, seems to be mainly the abode of daddy long legs spiders. That leaves my workshop shed. And there, across the back of the shed, T. gigantea holds sway - but at the front of the shed there are no less than 4 False Widows in residence. And to be honest, I haven't poked into all the deepest nooks yet.... So please amend your records to not one but four instances of this spider in Taunton.
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Fri 4th October 2013 19:18 by Chris Lea
False Widow - Taunton location details
Using your 'locate' zoom, I've pinpointed my shed and the location details it gave were - Grid square ST2332726755 (51.035022, -3.094865) Hope that helps. As a thought, the shed it's in is one of a row of four sheds, so I'd suggest that there could well be other's thriving in odd corners. But this one is the most noticeable as it's home is right near the light switch near the roof of my shed. It's got a spread-out platform of web and a woven home fitted into a handy nook.  It seems to be more active in the evening - I don't tend to visit the shed at night though!
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Fri 4th October 2013 15:10 by Peter Harvey
Re: Help on identifying
No, this is the orb web spider Zygiella x-notata, widespread in and near houses and gardens, living on fences and under eaves, window frames etc, and even car wing mirrors.
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Fri 4th October 2013 15:09 by Peter Harvey
Re: False Black Widow Spider in Taunton
Dear Chris

Can you provide the postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference so that your record can be added to the recording scheme contact us. There are previous records on either side of Taunton and nowadays the spider occurs widely across southern England and into Wales (see Summary. The media coverage on this spider is widely exaggerated and scaremongering. The spider should not be handled, but otherwise should present no greater concern than social wasps and honey bees.

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Fri 4th October 2013 14:28 by Angela Goodram
Help on identifying
spider in my kitchen Copyright: Angela Goodram

Is this a false Widow???

got a lot in my kitchen

angie

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Fri 4th October 2013 11:34 by Chris Lea
False Black Widow Spider in Taunton
Hi there, False Widow Spider in Taunton Copyright: Chris Lea Having discovered this rather aggressive and energetic spider in my shed, I thought I'd spread the word, especially as a result of recent media coverage regarding bites. I submitted the details to "Wild about Britain" who confirmed my sighting and suggested that I mention it here, as there seem to be no other sightings actually in Taunton, so far.

So I hope it's of interest to someone - even if not to my wife, who won't now venture into my shed - hurray!

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Tue 1st October 2013 12:40 by Simon Knevett
Thanks to Peter Harvey
Having googled your selection I reckon you're right! Thanks for the help, I'll be looking for his web tomorrow when I'm next in
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Tue 1st October 2013 07:00 by Peter Harvey
This looks like Zygiella x-notata, a widespread orb web spider of houses and gardens, living on fences and under eaves, window frames etc, and even car wing mirrors.
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