Forum

Welcome to our general Forum page.  Please feel free to post a comment on any issue or topic area. If you upload a picture, it will be available for you to insert here with your post. IF YOU WANT HELP WITH IDENTIFICATION, PLEASE PROVIDE A FULL POSTCODE OR GRID REFERENCE AND DATE of the record in your post so that it can be added to the recording scheme. You will need to register and be logged-on to post to the forum. Find out more

Wed 30th August 2017 15:13 by Peter Harvey
Yes, this looks like Steatoda nobilis, the so-called 'noble false widow', the spider which the media make such an unjustified fuss about. It has been frequent in the southern coastal counties of England for a great many years, and is nowadays frequent and abundant in many areas of southern England and increasingly further north. The media frenzy caused by this spider is unwarranted. Steatoda nobilis spiders are unobtrusive, have no interest in attacking humans and would only bite if they were put into a position where they do so as a defensive reaction. Honey bees and social wasps pose a far greater risk. There are a number of other 'false widows' in Britain, some which are native or have been in the country for centuries, so there is a lot of misinformation about these spiders.
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Tue 29th August 2017 22:20 by Mark Chamberlain
Fales Widow Fareham Hants
Good evening,

I just found this not so little chap on the ceiling in my sons room... can you confirm if its a false widow please? False Widow - Portchester Copyright: Mark Chamberlain. I evicted it after collecting it in my spider trap.

Post code PO16 9FB

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Sun 27th August 2017 16:59 by Peter Harvey
Yes, Araneus marmoreus var. pyramidatus male (adult male spiders have complex palps used in mating, and these are visible in your photo). The larger orb web spiders become adult in late summer and become more visible, but Araneus marmoreus var. pyramidatus is genuinely very local (and e.g. a rare spider in Essex).  (see summary page), although may be present in some numbers where it is found.
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Sat 26th August 2017 19:41 by John Clark
Re/ Araneus marmoreus var. pyramidatus Sat 26th August 2017 00:
Araneus marmoreus var. pyramidatus - male Copyright: John Clark

Thank you for confirming my ID . This spider had what appeared to be a male 'suitor' attempting to approach her at the time I took this photograph. The second spider which I thought perhaps a male was much slimmer and sleeker but with similar colouration.

Today 26/08/2017 again out photographing hoverflies I came across another of these spiders a short distance away from the first reported specimen together with what appeared to be an attentive male. Grid Ref. SS60293148 The larger of the two spiders which I assume is the female was exactly the same in appearance as the one I photographed yesterday and again the one I assume to be male was similar in pattern and colour but much slimmer. Perhaps these are not as uncommon as we think but I suppose if we have a breeding community in this area and considering the number of young they can have we may well have a thriving population of them here in Landkey ? Many thanks. John

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Sat 26th August 2017 19:01 by Anthony Davies
Possible false wolf spider
I found this spider on the branch of a cotoneaster bush in the back garden of my mother-in-law's home in SW London. I have some video footage of it crawling up my arm which is much clearer than the uploaded image. It was a very handsome spider, I must say, with striking markings. The overall colouring was light brown. I think it was a female, without enlarged pedipalps, and I calculate the body length at something over 1.5 cm, and overall length including the legs of around 4.5 cm.  At first I thought it might be one of the Amaurobius species, but having compared it to other very similar images on the UK Safari website I believe it to be a false wolf spider Zoropsis spinimana. I was very interested to read that it is an introduced species and uncommon. Possible false wolf spider Zoropsis Spinimana Copyright: Anthony Davies
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Sat 26th August 2017 18:09 by Peter Harvey
Re: What type of spider is it
This is a garden spider Araneus diadematus. These become adult in late summer and early autumn, and then their presence on their large orb webs is often more obvious in gardens. It is also a very variable spider in terms of colour and depth of markings. They are harmless to humans.
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Sat 26th August 2017 18:06 by Peter Harvey
Re: Sat 26th August 2017 00:32 by John Clark
Yes, Araneus marmoreus pyramidatus. Thanks for the details.
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Sat 26th August 2017 18:05 by Peter Harvey
Re: what species is this please
This looks like Steatoda nobilis, the so-called 'noble false widow', the spider which the media make such an unjustified fuss about. It has been frequent in the southern coastal counties of England for a great many years, and is nowadays frequent and abundant in many areas of southern England, including the south coast, south-west, south-east, London area and East Anglia, and increasingly much further north. The media frenzy caused by this spider is unwarranted. Steatoda nobilis spiders are unobtrusive, have no interest in attacking humans and would only bite if they were put into a position where they do so as a defensive reaction. Honey bees and social wasps pose a far greater risk. There are a number of other 'false widows' in Britain, some which are native or have been in the country for centuries, so there is a lot of misinformation about these spiders.
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Sat 26th August 2017 12:47 by Shaun Winter
What type of spider is it
I have never seen this spider type before what type is it .Front garden newcommer Copyright: Shaun Winter
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Sat 26th August 2017 00:32 by John Clark
I am new to this site but while out photographing hoverflies today I came across this spider which I am fairly certain is Araneus marmoreus - var. pyramidatus which my spider book says is uncommon so thought I should perhaps report it as a record for you if my ID is correct of course. Seen 25/08/2017 in Landkey , North Devon :- SS60223153

Orbweb Spider - Araneus marmoreus - Var. pyramidatus Copyright: John Clark

Many thanks

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Thu 24th August 2017 11:47 by Anne Lin
Re: what species is this please
Thanks Peter for letting me know, i thought it could be. It fell on my arm and was quite peaceful!
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Thu 24th August 2017 08:52 by Peter Harvey
Re: My first spider
This is an example of the Four+Spot-Orbweaver Araneus quadratus, see Four Spot-Orbweaver and summary pages. Like the closely related Garden Spider, it is very variable in colour and degree and shape of markings.
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Thu 24th August 2017 08:50 by Peter Harvey
Re: What species is this please?
As indicated on the forum post and picture upload pages, please provide a full postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference for the spider if you want help with identification.
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Wed 23rd August 2017 21:47 by Alan Stapleton
My first spider
Found today 23/8/17 in wet heathland on Bodmin Moor at SX110743. Can somebody kindly ID it so it can be recorded please, Many thanks, Alan Stapleton ebodminmoorspi Copyright: Alan Stapleton
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Wed 23rd August 2017 19:05 by Anne Lin
What species is this please?
Found today in south west Cornwall.Spider in Cornwall today Copyright: Anne Lin Have added to the recording scheme as well. Thanks!
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Tue 22nd August 2017 19:01 by Peter Harvey
Re: Spider query
Yes, this is Pisaura mirabilis. It will be juvenile at this time of year.
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Tue 22nd August 2017 19:01 by Peter Harvey
Re Tue 22nd August 2017 09:35 by Ben Epstein
I would say this is Steatoda grossa. There is a trace of this species typical pale markings as found in juveniles and males. The adult females often have no visible markings at all.
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Tue 22nd August 2017 18:29 by Martin Usher
Spider query
Found on a shrub in a garden in East Sussex TQ875120, today 22/08/17. Have a tentative id of Pisaura mirablis but would like a bit of help please.

P.mirabils.query Copyright: Martin Usher

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Tue 22nd August 2017 09:35 by Ben Epstein
Unidentified all dark spider Copyright: Ben Epstein Unidentified all dark spider 2 Copyright: Ben Epstein Hi I have found two of these spiders in my flat in the past month. In size and appearance they are similar to male Steatoda grossa (which I find regularly in the flat) but without the white markings and reddish legs. The first had an all black abdomen and this one has a very faint suggestion of two paler spots. This spider plays dead when I try to pick it up. I haven't seen grossa do this, they usually run away very fast across the floor. I can't find any similar images online. Is this just a very dark false widow? Both grossa and nobilis are abundant in my block of flats. Thanks, all the best Ben Location N3 3PU, date 17/08/17
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Tue 8th August 2017 13:14 by Donal O'Donnell
Many thanks for confirming the identification and for sorting out my photo.  Although it was found in a garden, we do not bring in new plants from garden centres so it is a mystery how it turned up.  I will keep an eye out for any more in the surrounding area.  It is a very pretty beast.

Best wishes, Donal

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Mon 7th August 2017 11:34 by Peter Harvey
Yes, this is Synema globosum. Crab spiders will actively catch and feed on many different insects and other invertebrates. To date there has been no proof of an established population of the spider, and records have either certainly or may have been the result of casual imports e.g. in flowers etc. There is good reason though to expect it to become established, since it is very widespread in Europe.

The reason your photo did not show in the post was that you managed to double insert it soemhow. You can insert a picture simpling by clicking once on the mini photo shown above the text entry. I have sorted that out now.

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Sun 6th August 2017 13:22 by Donal O'Donnell
Napoleon Spider?
Napoleon Spider Copyright: Donal O'Donnell I found the spider in the attached photo today (6th August 2017) on a Common Knapweed (Centaurea nigra) flower in my garden at Kingston near Cambridge. (TL347547). (CB23 2NJ)

I think it is a Napoleon Spider (Synaema globosum/) .  I have not seen one before so it would be good if you could confirm this. 

Is this spreading in the UK now?  Do you know what it usually feeds on?

Many thanks,

Donal. PS.  I don't seem to see the photo I uploaded.  How do I get it into the forum post?

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Tue 1st August 2017 15:59 by Steve Franks
Steatoda nobilis?
We share our house and conservatory with a number of spiders. some of these are Steatoda, but I'm not sure which species. Can anyone identify them from this photo? Steatoda in my bathroom Copyright: Steve Franks Thanks in advance, Steve

CT14 9PJ 01/08/2017

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