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Wed 30th October 2019 17:04 by Peter Harvey
This is the orb web spider Nuctenea umbratica, a species with a slightly flattened body which hides under bark and in crevices. It is commonly found on walls and fences in gardens and is harmless to humans.
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Wed 30th October 2019 10:59 by Adrienne Lloyd
identification please?
I've not seen one like this before - its on a hose connector so the body is about 5mm Taken 29 Oct 19 Copyright: Adrienne Lloyd Posssibly Walnut Orb Weaver?
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Mon 28th October 2019 12:09 by Peter Harvey
This would need to be confirmed by microscopical examination of an adult. You are welcome to send one to me at 32 Lodge lane, Grays Essex RM16 2YP.
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Mon 28th October 2019 11:20 by Al Pashby
Holocnemus pluchei
I found a small colony of what appears to be Holocnemus pluchei (Marbled cellar spider) in a room at work. I didn't take much notice of them at first as I thought they were Pholcus phalangioides until one made a web at eye-level and I saw the markings on the abdomen.

There doesn't seem to be a lot of records for this spider in the UK, I'm guessing because they get passed off as Pholcus and nobody takes a closer look.

Photo taken in Cornwall TR113DB

Marbled cellar spider Copyright: Al Pashby

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Thu 24th October 2019 14:08 by David Callender
arran spider
thanks Peter for your input
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Mon 21st October 2019 19:39 by Peter Harvey
This is a juvenile Metellina species.
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Mon 21st October 2019 18:52 by David Callender
Query Arran identity to araneus quadratus
Unknown spider on clump sea thrift at low level six inches from ground, webbed over dead flowers, flowers on bare rock well above high tide line, many midges in web, spider using underneath of old flower head as hide point observed kings cross point, Arran, opposite Holy Isle 057285 16/10/19 in fine still evening weather with midges active. Observable four spots and red markings, poor photos sorry, but no record for the species of four spot orb weaver on Arran. Grateful for assistance
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Sun 20th October 2019 14:58 by Barry Walter
Re: ID Request
Thanks Peter. I had considered Hypsosinga, but I couldn't find any similar images on the net. I will ID as Hypsosinga cf. pygmaea juv.
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Sun 20th October 2019 10:08 by Peter Harvey
This will be a juvenile Hypsosinga, probably pygmaea. The juveniles are very variable in colour and pattern.
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Sat 19th October 2019 12:54 by Barry Walter
ID Request
I found this spider recently, but despite the distinctive colours and markings I have been unable to identify it. The size is approximately 3mm, and the habitat was a small area of grass tussocks. My best guess is Theridiidae or Linyphiidae, but I can't find anything similar within those groups. Any help in narrowing it down would therefore be much appreciated. The observation was made on a footpath near Ashurst Place, Langton Green (TQ539394), on 2nd October 2019.

Hypsosinga (2019-10-02) Copyright: Barry Walter

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Wed 16th October 2019 19:50 by Peter Harvey
Re: spider ID
please note, IF YOU WANT HELP WITH IDENTIFICATION, PLEASE PROVIDE A FULL POSTCODE OR GRID REFERENCE AND DATE of the record in your post so that it can be added to the recording scheme.
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Wed 16th October 2019 19:49 by Peter Harvey
Re: Is this Nesticus cellulanus?
As far as one can tell from the photo, this is likely to be one of the forms of Metellina merianae. It is not Nesticus.
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Wed 16th October 2019 18:19 by Ian Walker
Spider ID
Hi,

Caught this strange looking spoder in my house, no idea what it is, any idea's? We get plenty of giant house spinders but never seen anything like this before!

http://srs.britishspiders.org.uk/portal.php/p/Picture/s/Spider+ID2

Spider ID2 Copyright: Ian Walker Spider ID Copyright: Ian Walker

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Tue 15th October 2019 14:42 by Robert Fuchs
Is this Nesticus cellulanus?
Spider photographed on a sunny day at the Fort (now a museum) at Chapel Bay, Angle, south Pembrokeshire in June this year.  I have not managed to ID it, but think that it may be Nesticus cellanus - it was lurking in a cavity in one of the fort walls. This is my first post to this site, and I have uploaded the picture but cannot find the direct link to the photo, which was uploaded separately, url below. http://srs.britishspiders.org.uk/portal.php/p/My%20Pictures/r/view/u/2854/x/7569a68a link.

Photo is labelled "Spider in wall cavity in Pembrokeshire".  I don't think that there are many records of this species in the county.

Grid Ref SM 860 036

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Mon 7th October 2019 18:37 by Peter Harvey
This is a garden spider Araneus diadematus. These become adult in late summer and early autumn, and then their presence on their large orb webs is often more obvious in gardens. It is also a very variable spider in terms of colour and depth of markings. They are harmless to humans.
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Mon 7th October 2019 15:02 by David Callender
garden spider on ivy
unknown liverpool2 Copyright: David Callender unknown liverpool Copyright: David Callender One of several identical spiders sat in middle web on flowering ivy cocooning hoverfly Liverpool driveway L8 0SY 30/9/19 identity unknown, please assist david Callender
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Sun 6th October 2019 16:04 by Peter Harvey
Yes this is Steatoda nobilis, the so-called 'noble false widow', the spider which the media make such an unjustified fuss about. It has been frequent in the southern coastal counties of England for a great many years, and is nowadays frequent and abundant in many areas of southern England and Wales, including the south coast, south-west, south-east, London area and East Anglia, and increasingly much further north (see the Steatoda nobilis map. The media frenzy caused by this spider is unwarranted. Steatoda nobilis spiders are unobtrusive, have no interest in attacking humans and would only bite if they were put into a position where they do so as a defensive reaction. They are no greater risk than honey bees and social wasps. There are a number of other 'false widows' in Britain, some which are native or have been in the country for centuries, so there is a lot of misinformation about these spiders.
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Sun 6th October 2019 11:59 by Gerard Smith
Noble false widow?
Noble false widow identify Copyright: Gerard SmithPlease confirm if attached photo is noble false widow. I seem to have quite a few in the garden and house. Most reports of these spiders seem to be in the south and I live in south east Manchester so if it is I would be quite surprised. Postcode is M34 2dt photo taken 6th October 2019 09:31 am.
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Tue 1st October 2019 11:57 by Peter Harvey
Yes this is a garden spider Araneus diadematus. These become adult in late summer and early autumn, and then their presence on their large orb webs is often more obvious in gardens. It is also a very variable spider in terms of colour and depth of markings. They are harmless to humans.  The black mass will be the remains of an insect prey being macerated by the jaws.
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Tue 1st October 2019 11:38 by Helen Cramp
Identification needed please
I photographed this spider on the Griselinia hedge in our garden on the Isle of Wight (PO32 6LZ) on 30 September 2019. I think it is a species of common garden spider, but I am unsure.  Can anyone confirm this please ? Also, I noticed a black mass on it's mouth parts - I don't know very much about spiders, so did I catch it in the middle of preparing or eating a meal, or is there something wrong with it ?

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Tue 1st October 2019 11:35 by Peter Harvey
Yes, this is Steatoda nobilis, the so-called 'noble false widow', the spider which the media make such an unjustified fuss about. It has been frequent in the southern coastal counties of England for a great many years, and is nowadays frequent and abundant in many areas of southern England and Wales, including the south coast, south-west, south-east, London area and East Anglia, and increasingly much further north. The media frenzy caused by this spider is unwarranted. Steatoda nobilis spiders are unobtrusive, have no interest in attacking humans and would only bite if they were put into a position where they do so as a defensive reaction. They are no greater risk than honey bees and social wasps. There are a number of other 'false widows' in Britain, some which are native or have been in the country for centuries, so there is a lot of misinformation about these spiders.
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